Indian Journal of Dermatology
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 64  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 303--310

Metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia among Nigerians with lichen planus: A cross-sectional study


Ifeanyi Chibuzor Okpala1, Adeolu Oladayo Akinboro2, Ifeanyi Ogochukwu Ezejoifor1, Abel N Onunu3, Benson Uchechukwu Okwara3 
1 Department of Medicine, Dermatology Unit, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka and Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria
2 Department of Internal Medicine, Dermatology Unit, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso and LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria
3 Department of Medicine, Dermatology Unit, University of Benin and University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin, Edo State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Adeolu Oladayo Akinboro
Department of Internal Medicine, Dermatology Unit, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso and LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Oyo State
Nigeria

Background: Lichen planus (LP) is an inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology associated with chronic inflammation, oxidative stress induction, and cardiovascular risk factors. Objectives: To document the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS), dyslipidemia, and associated factors in Nigerian patients with LP. Methods: A cross-sectional design was made to evaluate 90 patients with LP and 90 controls for MetS and dyslipidemia in two Nigerian teaching hospitals. Diagnosis of LP was made with the aid of histology, and MetS and dyslipidemia were diagnosed using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results: The prevalence of MetS was insignificantly higher in LP than in control (18.9% vs. 13.5, P = 0.311), and dyslipidemia was significantly associated with LP (60% vs. 40%, P = 0.007). LP was associated with higher mean of serum triglyceride (1.21 ± 0.34 vs. 1.08 ± 0.32 mmol/L, P = 0.003), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (3.47 ± 0.89 vs. 3.12 ± 0.77 mmol/L, P = 0.007), and T-cholesterol (5.32 ± 0.88 vs. 4.92 ± 0.86, P = 0.002). LP patients with MetS were older (P < 0.001) and less likely to have Wickham's striae (P = 0.028) compared to those without MetS. Female LP patients were older (P = 0.047), obese (P = 0.043), and had insignificant increase in MetS prevalence compared to the males. Hypertrophic LP was more frequent in patients with dyslipidemia (63.0% vs. 27.8%, P = 0.002), and the family history of diabetes mellitus (DM) was an independent predictor of MetS in LP patients (odds ratio: 4.4, confidence interval: 1.0–19.1, P = 0.047). Limitation: Availability of fund is a significant factor that limited the sample size to the minimum required as always in a poor-resource setting. Conclusions: LP has an insignificant association with MetS and a significant association with dyslipidemia among Nigerians. The family history of DM is an independent predictor of MetS in LP patients. LP patients should be routinely screened for MetS and its components.


How to cite this article:
Okpala IC, Akinboro AO, Ezejoifor IO, Onunu AN, Okwara BU. Metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia among Nigerians with lichen planus: A cross-sectional study.Indian J Dermatol 2019;64:303-310


How to cite this URL:
Okpala IC, Akinboro AO, Ezejoifor IO, Onunu AN, Okwara BU. Metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia among Nigerians with lichen planus: A cross-sectional study. Indian J Dermatol [serial online] 2019 [cited 2022 Aug 14 ];64:303-310
Available from: https://www.e-ijd.org/article.asp?issn=0019-5154;year=2019;volume=64;issue=4;spage=303;epage=310;aulast=Okpala;type=0