Indian Journal of Dermatology
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E-IJD CURRENT PERSPECTIVE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 61  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 347

Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage syndrome: Case report and review of the published work


1 Department of Dermatology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto, Japan
2 Department of Inflammation and Immunology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto, Japan

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Noriaki Nakai
Department of Dermatology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Graduate School of Medical Science, 465 Kajii-cho, Kawaramachi Hirokoji, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto 602-8566
Japan
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5154.182463

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Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome are disease that fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). We report a 22-year-old Japanese woman presented with MAGIC syndrome and we described the clinicopathological characteristics of MAGIC syndrome based on a review of published cases from July 1985 to December 2015. In our case, the patient with oral aphthae, erythema nodosum, acne-like eruptions, uveitis, and polyarthritis fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of incomplete form of BD. The patient with uveitis, polyarthritis, and histological confirmation of chondritis also fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of RP. The patient was successfully treated with oral colchicine followed by prednisolone. The symptoms of MAGIC syndrome gradually disappeared, and the prednisolone dosage was gradually decreased and stopped. She has been in remission without active medication for a further 8 months. In the previous reports, some authors suggested that MAGIC syndrome was not a disease entity and might be RP occurring secondary to BD, another association of an autoimmune disease, or vasculitis with RP. However, the pathogenic association between MAGIC syndrome, BD, and RP is still unclear, and the number of reported cases of MAGIC syndrome is insufficient to establish a clear explanation. Therefore, further accumulation of data and careful observation of the clinical course are required to improve the understanding of MAGIC syndrome.


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