Indian Journal of Dermatology
BASIC RESEARCH
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 64  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 85--89

Assessment of melanogenesis in a pigmented human tissue-cultured skin equivalent


Nadja Nicole Zoller1, Matthias Hofmann1, Manuel Butting1, Igor Hrgovic1, Jürgen Bereiter-Hahn2, August Bernd1, Roland Kaufmann1, Stefan Kippenberger1, Eva Valesky1 
1 Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology, Goethe University Hospital, Frankfurt/Main, Germany
2 Kinematic Cell Research Group, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Nadja Nicole Zoller
Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology, Goethe University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt/Main
Germany

Background: Organotypic tissue-cultured skin equivalents are used for a broad range of applications either as possible substitute for animal tests or for transplantation in patient-centered care. Aims: In this study, we implemented melanocytes in a tissue-cultured full-thickness skin equivalent, consisting of epidermis and dermis. The versatility of this skin-like model with respect to pigmentation and morphological criteria was tested. Materials and Methods: Pigmented skin equivalents were morphologically characterized, and melanogenesis was evaluated after treatment with kojic acid – a tyrosinase inhibitor and forskolin – a well-known activator of the cyclic adenosine 3,5-monophosphate pathway. Pigmentation was measured either by determination of the extinction at 400 nm after melanin extraction with KOH correlated to a melanin standard curve or by reflectance colorimetric analysis, monitoring reflectance of 660 nm and 880 nm emitting diodes. Results: The morphological analysis revealed characteristic epidermal stratification with melanocytes located at the basal layer. Stimulation with forskolin increased the pigmentation, whereas treatment with kojic acid caused bleaching. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that the herein-introduced organotypic tissue-cultured skin equivalent is comparable to the normal human skin and its versatility in tests regarding skin pigmentation. Therefore, this model might help understand diseases with dysfunctional pigmentation such as melasma, vitiligo, and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.


How to cite this article:
Zoller NN, Hofmann M, Butting M, Hrgovic I, Bereiter-Hahn J, Bernd A, Kaufmann R, Kippenberger S, Valesky E. Assessment of melanogenesis in a pigmented human tissue-cultured skin equivalent.Indian J Dermatol 2019;64:85-89


How to cite this URL:
Zoller NN, Hofmann M, Butting M, Hrgovic I, Bereiter-Hahn J, Bernd A, Kaufmann R, Kippenberger S, Valesky E. Assessment of melanogenesis in a pigmented human tissue-cultured skin equivalent. Indian J Dermatol [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Aug 21 ];64:85-89
Available from: http://www.e-ijd.org/article.asp?issn=0019-5154;year=2019;volume=64;issue=2;spage=85;epage=89;aulast=Zoller;type=0