Indian Journal of Dermatology
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LEPROSY ROUND
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 60  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 55-59

Leprosy scenario at a tertiary level hospital in Delhi: A 5-year retrospective study


Departments of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Chander Grover
420-B, Pocket 2, Mayur Vihar, Phase-1, Delhi - 110 091
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5154.147793

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Background: Leprosy has been officially eliminated from India since December, 2005; still, there are districts and blocks reporting high prevalence indicating ongoing transmission. The present study aimed at determining the current clinical profile of leprosy from a tertiary level hospital in Delhi. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, record-based study was carried out on patients diagnosed and registered in the leprosy clinic of a tertiary level teaching hospital in East district of Delhi (April 2007 to March 2012). Data regarding demographic details, clinical features, treatment started and complications was analyzed. Results: A total of 849 patients were registered over a 5-year period, with M: F ratio of 2.3:1. 9.3% were children (ͳ14 years). 54.3% patients were immigrants from adjoining states. Multibacillary leprosy was the most common clinical type (86.9%). Borderline tuberculoid leprosy was the most frequent morphologic type, seen in 56.3% followed by borderline-borderline (1.5%), borderline lepromatous (24.9%), lepromatous leprosy (8.1%), pure neuritic (8.1%), histoid and indeterminate leprosy (0.5% each). 37.4% patients presented in reaction (Type I in 30.4% cases and Type II in 7% cases). WHO grade II deformities were diagnosed in 37.9% with claw hand being the most common paralytic deformity (23.3% cases). Conclusion: Our study offers insight into the current status of the disease in an area of otherwise low prevalence. It is seen that despite statistical elimination, multibacillary disease, leprosy reactions and deformities are commonly seen as presenting manifestations, in contrast to national projected trends. Delhi's unique demography with a high degree of migrant workers, presenting to our center (near border location) could be a possible contributing factor towards these aberrations. It highlights the need for continuation of targeted leprosy control activities and active case detection.


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