Indian Journal of Dermatology
  Publication of IADVL, WB
  Official organ of AADV
Indexed with Science Citation Index (E) , Web of Science and PubMed
 
Users online: 35  
Home About  Editorial Board  Current Issue Archives Online Early Coming Soon Guidelines Subscriptions  e-Alerts    Login  
    Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Print this page Email this page
SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 58  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 227-231

Alopecia mucinosa responding to antileprosy treatment: Are we missing something?


1 Department of Dermatology, P. D. Hinduja Hospital, Mahim, Mumbai, India
2 Thane Skin Centre, Thane, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Rajiv Joshi
14 Jay Mahal, A Road, Churchgate, Mumbai, Maharashtra
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5154.110834

Rights and Permissions

Three cases with single lesion of Alopecia mucinosa (follicular mucinosis) were treated with antileprosy treatment and showed rapid and complete resolution of the lesions with no recurrence on extended follow-up. Two children, a boy aged 14 years and a girl aged 12 years presented themselves, each, with a single hypopigmented, hypoesthetic patch on the face. Clinically leprosy was suspected, however, skin biopsy from both patients revealed follicular mucinosis as the only pathological finding, without any granulomas. Based on clinical suspicion both were started on multi drug therapy (MDT) for leprosy with complete resolution of the lesions. The third case, male, aged 22 years presented with a single erythematous, hypoesthetic plaque on the forehead.This lesion had been diagnosed as follicular mucinosis with folliculo-tropic mycosis fungoides, in the USA. He too responded completely within 3 months with rifampicin, ofloxacin, minocycline (ROM) treatment, which was given once monthly for a total of 6 months and remains free of disease since the past 1 year. Follicular mucinosis as the only pathology may be seen in facial lesions of clinically suspected leprosy in children and young adults. Based on histological findings these cannot be diagnosed as leprosy and will be considered as Alopecia mucinosa. These lesions, however, are always single and show rapid and complete response to antileprosy treatment. The authors suggest that in regions endemic for leprosy, such as India, single lesion Alopecia mucinosa on the face in children and young adults should be given antileprosy treatment.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed3607    
    Printed50    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded75    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal