Indian Journal of Dermatology
  Publication of IADVL, WB
  Official organ of AADV
Indexed with Science Citation Index (E) , Web of Science and PubMed
 
Users online: 256  
Home About  Editorial Board  Current Issue Archives Online Early Coming Soon Guidelines Subscriptions  e-Alerts    Login  
    Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Print this page Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 58  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 107-112

Incidence and care of environmental dermatoses in the high-altitude region of Ladakh, India


1 Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy, Command Hospital, Eastern Command, Kolkata, India
2 Commandant, Military Hospital Leh, India
3 Department of Dermatology, AFMC, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
G K Singh
Graded Specialist (Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy), Command Hospital, Eastern Command, Kolkata 27, West Bengal
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5154.108038

Rights and Permissions

Background : Low humidity, high-velocity wind, excessive ultraviolet (UV) exposure, and extreme cold temperature are the main causes of various types of environmental dermatoses in high altitudes. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out in patients visiting the lone dermatology department in Ladakh between July 2009 and June 2010. The aim was to identify the common environmental dermatoses in high altitudes so that they can be treated easily or prevented. The patients were divided into three demographic groups, namely, lowlanders, Ladakhis (native highlanders), and tourists. Data was analyzed in a tabulated fashion. Results: A total of 1,567 patients with skin ailments were seen, of whom 965 were lowlanders, 512 native Ladakhis, and 90 were tourists. The skin disorders due to UV rays, dry skin, and papular urticaria were common among all groups. The frequency of melasma ( n = 42; 49.4%), chronic actinic dermatitis (CAD) ( n = 18; 81.81% of total CAD cases), and actinic cheilitis ( n = 3; 100%) was much higher among the native Ladakhis. The frequency of cold-related injuries was much lesser among Ladakhis ( n = 1; 1.19%) than lowlanders ( n = 70; 83.33%) and tourists ( n = 13; 15.47%) ( P < 0.05). Conclusion: Dryness of skin, tanning, acute or chronic sunburn, polymorphic light reaction, CAD, insect bite reactions, chilblain, and frostbite are common environmental dermatoses of high altitudes. Avoidance of frequent application of soap, application of adequate and suitable emollient, use of effective sunscreen, and wearing of protective clothing are important guidelines for skin care in this region.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed4926    
    Printed55    
    Emailed2    
    PDF Downloaded96    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal