Indian Journal of Dermatology
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CASE REPORT
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 57  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 399-400

Prolonged varicella-zoster virus reinfection in an adult after unrelated cord blood transplantation


1 Department of Dermatology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan
2 Department of Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan
3 Department of Medical Oncology/Hematology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan

Correspondence Address:
Masahiro Oka
Department of Clinical Molecular Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017
Japan
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5154.100500

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Most varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections after cord blood transplantation (CBT) present as localized herpes zoster. Here, we report a case of VZV reinfection in an adult patient after CBT that appeared clinically to be varicella. A 50-year-old Japanese man underwent CBT for the management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Seventeen months later, he developed a small number of vesicles with umbilicated centers. A skin biopsy showed an intraepidermal blister containing degenerated balloon cells. Subsequently, the skin eruption developed over his entire body. The patient was treated with intravenous acyclovir for 5 days, followed by oral valacyclovir for 9 days. It took more than 3 weeks for most of the skin lesions to scab. Serum levels of anti-VZV IgG on days 3 and 33 after the onset of the skin eruption were negative and 260 mIU/ml, respectively. Serum anti-VZV IgM on days 3 and 33 was not detected. Our patient was diagnosed with VZV reinfection.


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