Indian Journal of Dermatology
  Publication of IADVL, WB
  Official organ of AADV
Indexed with Science Citation Index (E) , Web of Science and PubMed
 
Users online: 2993  
Home About  Editorial Board  Current Issue Archives Online Early Coming Soon Guidelines Subscriptions  e-Alerts    Login  
    Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Print this page Email this page


 
Table of Contents 
DERMATOSURGERY ROUND
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 56  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 663-665
Role of Q-switched ND:YAG laser in nevus of Ota: A study of 25 cases


Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy, Katihar Medical College, Katihar, Bihar, India

Date of Web Publication14-Jan-2012

Correspondence Address:
Shivangi Sharma
Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy, Katihar Medical College, Katihar - 854 105, Bihar
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5154.91824

Rights and Permissions

   Abstract 

Background: Nevus of Ota is common condition in Indian patients. The condition is more common in females, with a male-female ratio of 1:4.8. Aim : To evaluate long-term efficacy safety and stability of Q-switched ND:YAG laser in treatment of Nevus of Ota. Design: 6 month follow-up of patients of Nevus of Ota, treated with Q-switched ND:YAG laser Materials and Methods : Twenty-five patients of Nevus of Ota were treated with Q-switched ND:YAG laser for a period of 1 year and 9 months; patient had fitzpatricks skin type 4 and 5; detailed history, clinical examination, ophthalmoscopy, and otoscopy was done in all cases; clinical photographs were taken before and after the completion of treatments. Six-month follow-up was done after the last session. Response to treatment was graded based on physician's global assessment. Result : More than 70% improvement was seen in 15 patients (60%). Eight patients (32%) had moderate and two patients (8%) showed mild improvement.


Keywords: Laser in nevus, Nevus of Ota, Q-switched ND:YAG laser


How to cite this article:
Sharma S, Jha AK, Mallik SK. Role of Q-switched ND:YAG laser in nevus of Ota: A study of 25 cases. Indian J Dermatol 2011;56:663-5

How to cite this URL:
Sharma S, Jha AK, Mallik SK. Role of Q-switched ND:YAG laser in nevus of Ota: A study of 25 cases. Indian J Dermatol [serial online] 2011 [cited 2019 Aug 21];56:663-5. Available from: http://www.e-ijd.org/text.asp?2011/56/6/663/91824



   Introduction Top


Nevus of Ota, also known as nevus fuscoceruleus ophthalmo-maxillaris, [1] was first described by Ota in 1939. [2] It is characterized by blue-black or gray-brown dermal melanocytic pigmentation and typically occurs in areas innervated by the first and second branches of the trigeminal nerve. Mucosal pigmentation may occur involving the conjunctiva, sclera, and tympanic membrane. The condition is usually congenital. In 1988, Nevus of Ota was subclassified as mild, moderate, intensive, and bilateral. Bilateral Ota nevus should be differentiated from Hori nevus, which is acquired and does not have mucosal involvement. Malignant melanoma may rarely develop in these lesions. The treatment of this condition remains a challenge for the dermatologists.


   Materials and Methods Top


Twenty-five patients of Nevus of Ota were treated with Q-switched ND:YAG laser for a period of 1 year (average 8 sessions) and 9 months. Of the 25 patients, five were males and the rest were females. One patient had a bilateral involvement. Patients had skin types 4 and 5. The results were documented and clinical photographs were taken before [Figure 1], [Figure 3] and after [Figure 2], [Figure 4] completion of treatments. Six-month follow-up was done after the last session. Response to treatment was graded based on physician's global assessment.
Figure 1: Pre-treatment

Click here to view
Figure 2: Post-treatment

Click here to view
Figure 3: Pre-treatment

Click here to view
Figure 4: Post-treatment

Click here to view



   Results Top


Twenty-five patients of Nevus of Ota were treated with Q-switched ND: YAG laser for a period of 1 year (average 8 sessions). Of the 25 patients, five were males and the rest were females. One patient had a bilateral involvement. Patients had skin types 4 and 5. The results were documented and clinical photographs were taken before and after the completion of treatments. Six-month follow-up was done after the last session. Response to treatment was graded based on physician's global assessment.


   Discussion Top


Hulkey first described oculodermal melanosis in 1861 and in 1916, Pusey was the first to draw attention to the relationship of a pigmented lesion of facial skin to the pigmentation of ipsilateral sclera in a Chinese student. In 1939, Ota and Tanino described several cases of pigmented nevus of the skin and eye and named them "nevus fuscoceruleus ophthalmomaxillaris of Ota." Melanocytes move from the neural crest to the skin during early embryonic life. Failure of complete migration into the epidermis before birth with ensuing dermal nesting and melanin production produces characteristic blue patches. Dermal melanin produces blue colour because of the Tyndall effect in which all but the blue end of the light spectrum penetrates into the deep dermis and is absorbed by dermal melanin. Sex hormones have been implicated in the pathogenesis of the Nevus of Ota. [3]

In our study of 25 patients, five were males and the rest were females. One patient had a bilateral involvement. Patients had skin types 4 and 5. The results were documented and clinical photographs were taken before and after the completion of treatments. Six-month follow-up was done after the last session.

In a study by Teekhasaenee et al.,[4] 59.3% had ocular and dermal involvement, while 35% had dermal involvement. Of the nine cases with ocular involvement, all had episcleral involvement, while three (33.3%) each had involvement of the palpebral conjunctiva and the retina. Teekhasaenee et al. [4] reported 100% episcleral involvement, 10% conjunctival involvement, and 18% retinal involvement. Glaucoma was observed in a case of bilateral Nevus of Ota. Foulks and Shields [5] and Khawly et al.[6] have reported this association.


   Conclusions Top


Twenty-five patients of Nevus of Ota were treated with Q-switched ND:YAG laser for a period of 1 year and 9 months (average 8 sessions). Of the 25 patients, five were males and the rest were females. One patient had a bilateral involvement. Patients had skin types 4 and 5. The results were documented and clinical photographs were taken before and after the completion of treatments. Six-month follow-up was done after the last session. Response to treatment was graded based on physician's global assessment.

 
   References Top

1.Wolff K, Goldsmith LA, Katz SI, Gilchrest BA, Paller AS, Leffell Fitzpatricksb DJ. Dermatology in General Medicine 2008. p. 632.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Braff MH, Bardan A, Nizet V, Gallo RL. Cutaneous defense mechanisms by antimicrobial peptides. J Invest Dermatol 2005;125:9-13.   Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  
3.Sekar S, Kuruvila M, Pai HS. Nevus of Ota: A series of 15 cases. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2008;74:125-7  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.Teekhasaenee C, Ritch R, Rutnin U, Leelawongs N. Ocular findings in oculodermal melanocytosis. Arch Ophthalmol 1990;108:1114-20.   Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  
5.Foulks GN, Shields MB. Glaucoma in oculodermal melanocytosis. Ann Ophthalmol 1977;9:1299-304.   Back to cited text no. 5
[PUBMED]    
6.Khawly JA, Imami N, Shields MB. Glaucoma associated with nevus of Ota. Arch Ophthalmol 1995;113:1208-9.  Back to cited text no. 6
[PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3], [Figure 4]

This article has been cited by
1 Laser treatment of periocular skin conditions
Breton Yates,Syril Keena T. Que,Logan DíSouza,Jeanine Suchecki,Justin J. Finch
Clinics in Dermatology. 2015; 33(2): 197
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
2 Lasers for nevi: a review
Harleen Arora,Leyre Falto-Aizpurua,Anna Chacon,Robert D. Griffith,Keyvan Nouri
Lasers in Medical Science. 2014;
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
3 A Retrospective Analysis of the Clinical Efficacies of Q-switched Alexandrite and Q-switched Nd:YAG Lasers in the Treatment of Nevus of Ota in Korean Patients
Jae Eun Choi,Joo Bong Lee,Ki Beom Park,Bang Soon Kim,Un-Cheol Yeo,Chang Hun Huh,Jie Hoon Kim,Young Chul Kye
Journal of Dermatological Treatment. 2014; : 1
[Pubmed] | [DOI]



 

Top
Print this article  Email this article
 
 
  Search
 
  
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
    Article in PDF (1,168 KB)
    Citation Manager
    Access Statistics
    Reader Comments
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  


    Abstract
   Introduction
    Materials and Me...
   Results
   Discussion
   Conclusions
    References
    Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed4714    
    Printed111    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded97    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 3    

Recommend this journal