Indian Journal of Dermatology
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IJD SYMPOSIUM
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 55  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 161-170

Biological therapy of psoriasis


1 Department of Medicine, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose, CA 95128; Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817,
2 Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817,
3 Veterans Affairs Northern California Health Care System, Sacramento, CA 95655; Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817,
4 Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817; Veterans Affairs Northern California Health Care System, Sacramento, CA 95655,

Correspondence Address:
Emanual Maverakis
3301 C Street Suite 1400, Sacramento CA 95816

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DOI: 10.4103/0019-5154.62754

PMID: 20606887

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The treatment of psoriasis has undergone a revolution with the advent of biologic therapies, including infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, efalizumab, and alefacept. These medications are designed to target specific components of the immune system and are a major technological advancement over traditional immunosuppressive medications. These usually being well tolerated are being found useful in a growing number of immune-mediated diseases, psoriasis being just one example. The newest biologic, ustekinumab, is directed against the p40 subunit of the IL-12 and IL-23 cytokines. It has provided a new avenue of therapy for an array of T-cell-mediated diseases. Biologics are generally safe; however, there has been concern over the risk of lymphoma with use of these agents. All anti-TNF-α agents have been associated with a variety of serious and "routine" opportunistic infections.


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