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IJD SYMPOSIUM
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 55  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 68-78

Dengue viral infections


1 Colombo South Teaching Hospital, Sri Lanka
2 Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, NSW, Australia
3 Department of Microbiology, University of Colombo, Colombo, Sri Lanka
4 Department of Microbiology Infectious Diseases Hospital, Colombo, Sri Lanka
5 Department of Clinical Immunology, St. Mary's Hospital and Imperial College, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Suranjith L Seneviratne
Department of Clinical Immunology, St. Mary's Hospital, 2nd Floor, Jeffries Wing, Praed Street, London, W2 1NY
United Kingdom
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5154.60357

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Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections.


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