Indian Journal of Dermatology
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CASE REPORT
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 54  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 19-20
A skin burn associated with Ranunculus arvensis (wedding bloom)


1 Department of Emergency Medicine, Dicle University, Faculty of Medicine, Diyarbakir, Turkey
2 Southeast Anatolia Agricultural Research Institute, Diyarbakir, Turkey

Correspondence Address:
Murat Orak
Dicle Universitesi, Tip Fakültesi, ILK ve ACIL YARDIM ABD. 21280, Diyarbakir
Turkey
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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   Abstract 

Ranunculus arvensis L-a member of Ranunculaceae family- is grown as a wild plant in productive agriculture lands of the altitude between 1 to 1850 m mainly in the Mediterranean Region and Iran-Turan vegetation in Turkey. Skin burn cases associated with Ranunculaceae family is very limited in literature and according to the authors' knowledge this is the only report in literature from Turkey. In this report, we have presented a case of skin burn associated with Ranunculus arvensis represented to our emergency service.


Keywords: Emergency service, Ranunculus arvensis, skin burn


How to cite this article:
Orak M, Ustundag M, Guloglu C, Tas M, Baylan B. A skin burn associated with Ranunculus arvensis (wedding bloom). Indian J Dermatol 2009;54, Suppl S1:19-20

How to cite this URL:
Orak M, Ustundag M, Guloglu C, Tas M, Baylan B. A skin burn associated with Ranunculus arvensis (wedding bloom). Indian J Dermatol [serial online] 2009 [cited 2018 Dec 11];54, Suppl S1:19-20. Available from: http://www.e-ijd.org/text.asp?2009/54/5/19/45435



   Introduction Top


Ranunculus arvensis L - a member of Ranunculaceae family-is grown up as a wild plant in productive agriculture lands of the altitude between 1 to 1850 m mainly in the Mediterranean Region and Iran-uran vegetation in Turkey. [1] The plant has been used in our region for the treatment of asthma, rheumatism, high fever, gut disease and also is known to be a poison when the plant is fresh. [2] In this report, we have presented a case of skin burn associated with Ranunculus arvensis presented to our emergency service [Figure 1].


   Case History Top


A 64-year-old male patient was referred to our emergency service with the complaints of vesiculo-bullous lesions and swelling on the left distal 1/3 of thigh [Figure 2]. The patient had noticed pain for a long time on his left knee and therefore with some empiric advices he had pureed the plant and applied the puree on the regions with pain hoping to be cured. He had wrapped up his leg with a clean cloth and covered it for 12h. Immediately after the lesions had been noticed the patient had reported to the emergency service. In physical examination, all vital signs were stable. An approximate burn of 8% of the second degree was present on distal 1/3 of thigh to distal 1/3 of leg. Examination of other systems and laboratory analyses were normal. After the debris was removed and the lesion was cleaned, nitrofurantoin was administered and the wound was dressed with normal saline two times a day. The treatment was initiated with antibiotics and analgesic-antipyretics together with low molecular weight heparin. Complete recovery was noticed after three weeks [Figure 3]. The samples of the plant which applied to the patient (as plant puree) by himself were defined as Ranunculus arvensis L.


   Discussion Top


Although a study on the organic content of Ranunculus arvensis L has not been performed, some studies on the species of Ranunculaceae family have established that they include protoanemonin containing saponin, hederoganin and oleanolic acid glycosides which inflame the skin and damage the mucosal membranes in subcutis and these substances are used for the treatment of hemorrhoidal symptoms. It is reported that destructive effect of protoanemonin is much more when the plant is fresh; however this effect decreases after the plant gets withered. [3]

Protoanemonins are volatile and highly irritating lipids that increase free oxygen radicals by inhibiting DNA polymerase. [4] When it is applied on the skin it produces blistering by; demolishing the sulphide chains, it leads to bulla formation and subepidermal separation. [5],[6] In our case, we presume that the effect of toxic substance in the plant had caused the second degree skin burn. Protoanemonin is rapidly polymerized to anemonine that (its crystallized form is harmless) is a caustic poison containing two lactones. The withered or the boiled plants do not contain protoanemonin.

Many people use members of the Ranunculaceae family as traditional treatments for abscess drainage, [7] blister formation, [6],[8] hemorrhoids, [6],[8],[9] burns, lacerations and abrasions as poultices [6],[10] and as herbal remedies for myalgia, common cold and other diseases [6],[10] In our case, the puree of the plant was used for the treatment of knee pain which had lasted for a long time.

Skin burn cases associated with Ranunculaceae family is very limited in literature and according to the authors' knowledge this is the only report from Turkey. Yenidünya et al , [11] had reported that Ceratocephalus falcatus - another member of Ranunculaceae family was used in a woman for the same indication as in our patient.

From the ancient ages, due to an incorrect belief, many complications have been developed with the plants used for treatment. Plant purees used for the treatment of arthralgia may cause chemical burns.

 
   References Top

1.Davis PH. Flora of Turkey and East Aegean ?sland. Edinburgh University Press; 1970. p. 148-89.  Back to cited text no. 1    
2.Nayar RN, Chopra SL, IC Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants (Including the Supplement). New Delhi: Council of Scientific and Industrial Research; 1986  Back to cited text no. 2    
3.Bruneton J. Pharmacognosy, Phytohemistry medicinal plants, 2 th ed. New York: 1999.  Back to cited text no. 3    
4.Li RZ, Ji XJ. The cytotoxicity and action mechanism of ranunculin in vitro . Yao Hsueh Hsueh Pao 1993;28:326-31.  Back to cited text no. 4  [PUBMED]  
5.Burbach JP. The blistering effect of buttercups. Ned T Geneesk 1963;107:1128.  Back to cited text no. 5  [PUBMED]  
6.Metin A, Calka O, Behcet L, Yildirim E. Phytodermatitis from Ranunculus damascenus. Contact Dermatitis 2001;44:183.  Back to cited text no. 6    
7.Zeybek N. Farmaso¨tik botanik. Ege Univ. Eczacilik Fakü ltesi Yay?n 1985;1:102.  Back to cited text no. 7    
8.Towsent CC. Flora of Iraq. Baghdad: Ministry of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform Public of Iraq; 1980. p. 707.  Back to cited text no. 8    
9.Tanker N, Koyuncu M, Cos¸kun M. Farmaso¨tik botanik Ankara Univ Eczacilik Fakultesi Yayinlari 1998;9:222-9.  Back to cited text no. 9    
10.Turner NJ. Counter-irritant and other medicinal uses of plants in Ranunculaceae by native peoples in British Columbia and neighboring areas. J Ethnopharmacol 1984;11:181-201.  Back to cited text no. 10  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]
11.Yenidünya MO, Can Z, Demirseren ME. A burn from a plant. Plast Recontr Surg 1999;103:335-6.  Back to cited text no. 11    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3]

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    Abstract
    Introduction
    Case History
    Discussion
    References
    Article Figures

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