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SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 54  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 385-386
Species identification of Candida isolates obtained from oral lesions of HIV infected patients


Department of Microbiology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College & General Hospital, Sion, Mumbai - 400 002, India

Date of Web Publication5-Nov-2009

Correspondence Address:
V P Baradkar
Department of Microbiology, L.T.M.M.C and L.T.M.G.H, Sion, Mumbai - 400 022
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5154.57622

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   Abstract 

A total of 60 patients suspected to have AIDS with oral lesions suggestive of oral candidiasis were studied. Candida species were isolated from 50 patients. Candida albicans was the commonest isolate (70 %) followed Candida parapsilosis (15%), Candida glabrata (7.5%) and Candida tropicalis (5%) respectively. Candida dubliniensis was isolated from a single case only. Though the reports from developed countries show more prevalence of the novel species Candida dubliniensis, in our study it was isolated in a single case. All the patients were treated successfully with oral fluconazole for 7 days except for the patients from which Candida glabrata was isolated, who were treated with Amphotericin B.


Keywords: Oral candidiasis, HIV, Candida dubliniensis, Candida species


How to cite this article:
Baradkar V P, Kumar S. Species identification of Candida isolates obtained from oral lesions of HIV infected patients. Indian J Dermatol 2009;54:385-6

How to cite this URL:
Baradkar V P, Kumar S. Species identification of Candida isolates obtained from oral lesions of HIV infected patients. Indian J Dermatol [serial online] 2009 [cited 2019 Oct 17];54:385-6. Available from: http://www.e-ijd.org/text.asp?2009/54/4/385/57622



   Introduction Top


Oral candidiasis is the most common opportunistic infection in patients with HIV infection in India. [1] Various studies have shown increasing incidence of candidiasis in HIV infected persons. [2],[3],[4],[5] In the recent past, there have been increasing reports implicating the non-albicans species of Candida in oropharyngeal candidiasis. [2],[3],[4],[5] We studied the prevalence and clinical and microbiological variations of oral candidiasis in HIV infected persons.

The study was conducted in the Department of Microbiology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College and General Hospital, Mumbai, from July 2005 to June 2008. A total number of 61 HIV seropositive patients with oral lesion/lesions suggestive of oral candidiasis, which were referred from the Department of Medicine and Dermatology, were included in the study of which 46 were males and 15 were females (male: female ratio of 3:1). The age group ranged between 20 and 60 years (mean age 40 years). Most common clinical presentation was pseudomembranous lesions [Figure 1] in 50 cases, followed by erythematous lesions in 10 cases. Candida species were isolated from 40 patients, demonstrating a prevalence of 66.57%. All the patients from whom Candida species were isolated presented with a burning sensation, dysphagia, and odynophagia suggestive of esophageal involvement. Candida albicans was the most common isolate 70% (28/40), followed by C. parapsilosis 15% (6/40), Candida tropicalis 5% (2/40), and C. glabrata 7.5% (3/40), while C. dubliniensis [Figure 2] was isolated in a single case (2.5%). Oropharyngeal candidiasis, the most common opportunistic infection in patients with HIV, occurs in as many as 90% of HIV infected persons at some point during the course of disease. [6] The prevalence of oral candidiasis in HIV infected patients in India varies between 41% [4] and 85%. [1] In India, it is the most common manifestation in HIV infected persons. [1],[2],[3],[4],[5] Though C. albicans is the most common cause of oral candidiasis, certain non-albicans species such as C. parapsilosis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. kefyr and new species C. dubliniensis[7] are now encountered. This study shows substantial increase in isolation of non-Candida albicans species (30%) as reported earlier by Kaviarasan et al. [1] (20.2%), and the new species i.e. C. dubliniensis is also isolated from HIV seropositive cases in this study.

 
   References Top

1.Kaviarasan PK, Thappa DM, Jaisankar TJ, Sujatha S. Candidiasis in HIV-infected patients: a clinical and microbiological study. Natl Med J India 2002;15:51-2.  Back to cited text no. 1  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  
2.Ramakrishna B, Tendolkar UM, Varaiya A, Dhurat R, Geogate A. Fluconazole isolates of Candida species for HIV positive patients. Ind J Med Microbiol 2000;18:30-2.  Back to cited text no. 2      
3.Salmon S, Ganesh AK. HIV in India. Top. HIV Med 2000;10:19-24.  Back to cited text no. 3      
4.Lattif AA, Banerjee U, Prasad R, Biswas A, Wig N, Sharma N, et al. Susceptibility pattern and molecular type of oropharyngeal lesions of Indian Immunodeficiency Virus patients. J Clin Microbiol 2004;42:1260-2.  Back to cited text no. 4  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  
5.Kumarasamy N, Solomon S, Jayaker Paul SA, Venilla R, Amalraj RE. Spectrum of opportunistic infections among AIDS patients in Tamil Nadu, India. Int J STD AIDS 1995;6:447-9.   Back to cited text no. 5  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  
6.Darouiche RO. Oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis in immunocompromised patients: Treatment issues. Clin Infect Dis 1998;26:259-74.  Back to cited text no. 6  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  
7.Sullivan D, Haynes K, Bille J, Boerlin P, Rodero L, Lloyd S, et al. The distribution of oral Candida dubliniensis strains in human immunodeficiency virus infection. J Clin Microbiol 1997;35:960-4.  Back to cited text no. 7  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]

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